Architectural Unveiling of ‘The Wenlock Arms’ Pub

[image: The Wenlock Arms Pub in Context – Photogrammetric Study]

– A PUBLIC HOUSE –

A place that is inviting
not only by the services it may offer
but
by its appearance and reputation.
The site is not important
as long as it provides a refuge to its
members.
Quality is the priority
in all aspects of existence
while
its environment can remain organic.
A public house, for me, should be ‘adequate’
whenever and forever.


It is important to note the change of density that occurred in a century and the change of use. In addition, there is a narrowing of the canal which shows its gradual deterioration. An important feature that promotes the area, today, is the neighbouring park by the name ‘Shepherdess Walk’ which is now the department of athletics for the pub. The pub is now the single element that discloses the richness of activity happening before the WWII and the park is somehow concealing the grief and destruction during the bombing of London. The Wenlock Arms is hiding a rich tradition that can be meticulously extracted by observations both from the outside and inside. It is now welcoming people from a wider range of areas and has a strong supporting clientele.
The pub is represented in plan and not in figure to signify its public character and in two different time instances of its existence. The choice of date is significant and representational of the 1890 and current condition of the neighbourhood.



[image: The Wenlock Arms Pub Interior – PhotoMerge Sequence]



The arrangement of furniture at its typology show the function of the space they occupy, such as the central u-shaped bar that is pin-pointed by the cash machine. The taps set perimetrically and the visual is unobstructed so that the customers can be served efficiently. Moving outwards, in a spiral motion, there are stools next to the bar and also in groups facing outwards, embracing a small table, evidence of the public character of the space. The spaces at the back provide a colder tone since they seem empty and unwell-coming. Circulation, service and frequency of use are signified by the change of material on the floors and the wearing off of the coating, in some cases.

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Architecturally, the setting of the Wenlock Arms is forming an obvious centerpoint, the bar in the centre, that in turn it radiates outwards with the act of conversation. The main objective was to define what is the character of the space that is beyond the constraints of the temporal. Working in conjunction with the trend of accumulation and also objectifying the existing element we were to draw in digital the narrative of the place. The cellar, the pub and the common-room are defining the spaces that are assigned to and the accumulation of objects operates accordingly.
The wall textures, the picture frames, bottles and pint glasses, the stools and food baskets, the empty barrels and the pressure gauges, the chains and the safety signs, the stacking chairs and the big table, curtains and table cloths, coasters, the piano and the light fixtures are the result of accumulation and temporality but this case are the elements that create this particular space.


– MY IDEAL PUB –

My pub is not registered as a
pub from its external appearance
but it is located via word travel. The
space is an abandoned warehouse
so that space is never a matter for
less people to get aquainted to.
Exposed materials and structural
units, sloppy amendments and ample
space are elements of the real
character of my space. Apart from
some corners that are furnished in
a homelike spirit, the rest of the space
is characterised by its accumulation
of objects and temporality of room
they occupy. The people make the
spaces and in their turn spaces
provide them with adaptability.


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